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Kabubbu Church2017-05-19T09:40:22+00:00

The Church in Kabubbu

The Quicken Trust is taking a holistic approach to transforming the Ugandan village of Kabubbu which has suffered decades of destitution and disease. The charity is focusing on meeting the spiritual needs of the people as well as their physical needs.

Quicken is a bridge between churches in the UK and those in Kabubbu. There is a strong Christian emphasis in the Primary and Trust High schools. Quicken has also been working with local churches of different denominations for more than ten years. Accomplishments include:

  • Training local pastors to give better teaching and support for their congregations
  • Putting a roof on one local church
  • Building a church baptistry
  • Supplying musical instruments and other resources for worship
  • Providing Bibles in local languages from the Stuart Hine Trust for pupils at the Primary school and Trust High School

Quicken has also shown inspirational films to the local community using equipment funded by the Spring Harvest Charitable Trust. Often more than 200 people turn up to watch.

A number of churches in the UK have been particularly supportive, including Gateway Christian Fellowship; Horam Chapel; St James Church, Exeter; St John’s Church, Rowlands Castle; St Peter & St Paul, Buckingham; St Wilfrid’s, Willingdon; Shinewater Community Church; The Society of Friends, Herstmonceux; Union Church, Heathfield; Waltham Chase Methodist Church; Welcome Baptist Church, Heathfield

The Church with No Name!

In 2007 Quicken and the Kabubbu Development Project set up a new church which meets at the Trust High School, the Kabubbu Community Church. More than 200 people attend Sunday morning meetings – mostly local families and pupils boarding at the school. It’s become known just as “the church that meets at the High School”.

The service opens with an hour of lively praise and worship and is followed by a preach lasting about 45 minutes. There’s also opportunity for testimonies and prayers from the congregation. Visitors and volunteers are usually given the chance to attend the church (Visit)

The church has home groups which meet during the week. It has also run Alpha Courses for villagers. There is also a women’s fellowship, a men’s fellowship and a Sunday school.

A growing demand for a more dedicated building of its own for a range of community services means a move to the centre of Kabubbu to be part of a Community Centre.

Click here to help create the Church & Community Centre.

Pastor Swaps Classroom for Pulpit

The pastor, Peter Babu, was appointed in April 2008. Peter is a former deputy head of the Primary school. He stepped down to concentrate on the church. In December 2011 he completed a diploma of Theology in Education at Kampala Evangelical School of Theology.

Peter’s aim is to provide spiritual encouragement and pastoral support in community. Watch: Peter video

The other elders are the Executive Director of the KDP, Enoch Kagoda and his wife Lillian, and Ben Misindye – head of the Trust High School.

Christianity is the most widely-held faith in Kabubbu. Among the other churches nearby are a Pentecostal, a Catholic, a Church of Uganda and a Seventh Day Adventist. Quicken and the elders at the church at the Trust High School have been keen to maintain good relations with all of them and Quicken personnel organise events for Churches Together. There are also a number of Muslim families who attend the local mosque.

Teaching through the church is vital to provide truth and dispel myths and superstitions which maintain a hold on a rural community. The local witchdoctor still exerts an unhealthy influence, offering charms and spreading nonsense such as the idea that AIDS can be cured if the sufferer sleeps with a virgin.

Home-grown Evangelism Best

There is a hunger in Kabubbu to hear about Jesus. Quicken Trust doesn’t take evangelists there, but encourages consistent outreach to the community. Uganda has plenty of evangelists who can speak the local languages and are more culturally relevant.

But local pastors do need theological training to get a better understanding of scripture. So there’s an appetite for books, DVDs, Bible study aids and other training materials. (Shop)